Qualification Levels

In order to maintain standards in clinical and educational testing, access to products is restricted to professionals who fulfil certain qualification criteria. These criteria are summarised as follows:

LEVEL 1:
  • Evidence of eligibility to practice professionally within the clinical/ educational population at which the product is aimed.
LEVEL 2:
  • Certified training and experience in a relevant discipline.
  • Membership of a professional organisation appropriate to the focus of the test.
  • Evidence of competence in the use of psychological tests.
LEVEL 3:
  • Certified training and experience in a relevant discipline.
  • Membership of a professional organisation appropriate to the focus of the test.
  • Evidence of competence in the use of psychological tests
  • Completion of test specific training e.g. Griffiths Mental Development Scales (GMDS) or Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule (ADOS)

Hogrefe is committed to upholding and maintaining correct and ethical testing standards.

We ask that any customer wishing to purchase a clinical or educational product completes a qualification declaration form. Once completed, please return the form to customersupport@hogrefe.co.uk.


Note on Educational Qualifications

Welcome to the Hogrefe guide to educational qualifications needed for using psychometric assessments at schools for assessing specific learning difficulties (SpLDs), Access Arrangements and the Disabled Students' Allowance (DSA).

 Qualifications related to the use of psychometric assessments at schools and assessing SpLDs are as follows:

ATS/APS

Approved Teacher Status (ATS) or Approved Practitioner Status (APS) is awarded to individuals who have successfully completed a course which meets the standards set by the British Dyslexia Association (BDA). The specific qualifications formally recognise experience in the field of dyslexia and SpLDs for non-diagnostic assessments.
Anyone with an ATS/APS who wishes to perform diagnostic assessments will also require an OCR Level 7, CCET, or APC accreditation.

OCR Level 7 Certificate

OCR Level 7 Certificate in Assessing and Teaching Learners with Specific Learning Difficulties (Dyslexia), the qualification is suitable for Professionals involved in assessment of pupils.

Certificate of Competence in Educational Testing (CCET)

This training is designed to enable professionals to understand how assessments using psychometric tests are developed, how to use them effectively and how to interpret the results.
In addition to this qualification, membership of one of the following associations is required: PATOSS, Dyslexia Action or the British Dyslexia Association.

Assessment Practising Certificate (APC)

The Department for Education requires that those who undertake specialist assessments in post-16 schools, colleges, universities, workplace training establishments and local authority assessment centres are competent and qualified to do so. An APC also entitles the holder to assess student eligibility (16 years or older) for the Disabled Students’ Allowance (DSA).

 

Qualifications related to the assessment of Access Arrangements are as follows:

Associate Member of the British Dyslexia Association (AMBDA)

This is available to:

- Teachers

- Psychologists

- Speech and language therapists

- Occupational therapists

who have successfully completed a postgraduate course which meets the standards set by the British Dyslexia Association (BDA). AMBDA formally recognises expertise in the field of dyslexia and SpLDs, and also recognises the individual’s ability to conduct diagnostic assessments for dyslexia.
Please note that AMBDA accreditation alone is not accepted as proof of your ability to conduct assessments for the Disabled Students’ Allowance (DSA).

 

Assessment Practising Certificate (APC)

The Department for Education requires that those who undertake specialist assessments in post 16 schools, colleges, universities, workplace training establishments and local authority assessments centres are competent and qualified to do so. An APC also entitles the holder to assess student eligibility (16 years or older) for the Disabled Students’ Allowance (DSA).

Certificate in Psychometric Testing: Assessment & Access (CPT3A)

CPT3A is a qualification allowing teachers or support tutors to conduct dyslexia/SpLD assessments for Access Arrangements.

Psychologists:

Must be registered with the Health Professions Council [open since 2009 and mandatory from July 2012]. Before mandatory registration with the HPC in July 2012, psychologists were required to hold a current practising certificate issued by their relevant professional association, for example, the British Psychological Association [NB:The British Psychological Society has now ceased issuing practising certificates].

 

Access Arrangements

What are Access Arrangements?

The authorities responsible for setting and monitoring Access Arrangements are the Standards and Testing Agency (STA) and the Joint Council for Qualifications.

Access Arrangements are special arrangements that can be made for any candidate sitting an exam who is proven to have specific difficulties. Evidence of below average performance on set criteria must be provided by the school or college requesting an Access Arrangement for a student.

For those in full-time or part-time undergraduate or postgraduate education, financial help can be sought via a Disabled Students’ Allowance (DSA). This is applicable to any student who has a disability, an ongoing health or mental health condition, or a specific learning difficulty (e.g. dyslexia, dyspraxia, dyscalculia, attention deficit disorder, and so on).

DSAs aim to assist students meet the additional costs they may incur as a result of their disability or specific learning difficulty and hence enable them to study on an equal par with other students. DSAs are provided in addition to standard student finance – they are not means-tested and are grants (thus do not need to be repaid).

If a student is looking to apply for a DSA, they will need to take a relevant psychometric assessment and provide evidence about their cognitive processing, attainments in numeracy and literacy, underlying ability, motor control skills and visual perceptual skills. The evidence provided must be no more than three years old at the time of entry to university, and must be from assessments undertaken post-16 years. A ‘top-up’ assessment (focusing on the student’s skills in reading, writing and spelling) is permissible in cases where an assessment was conducted prior to 16 years of age.

Related links

List of approved assessments: http://www.sasc.org.uk/SASCDocuments/REVISED%20guidelines-September%202013.pdf

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